Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Small Business And Startup Lawyer: IRS Income Tax Research Credits Can Now Be Used To Reduce Payroll Taxes !!!

Eligible small business startups can now choose to apply part or all of their research credit against their payroll tax liability, instead of their income tax liability, according to the Internal Revenue Service. 

This new option will be available for the first time to any eligible small business when filing its 2016 federal income tax return. 

Before 2016, the research credit, like most tax credits, could only be taken against income tax liability. The option to elect the new payroll tax credit may especially benefit any eligible startup that has little or no income tax liability.

To qualify for the new option for the current tax year, a small business must have gross receipts of less than $5 million and could not have had gross receipts prior to 2012. A small business meeting this standard with qualifying research expenses can then choose to apply up to $250,000 of its research credit against its payroll tax liability.

To choose this option, fill out Form 6765, Credit for Increasing Research Activities, and attach it to a timely-filed business income tax return. Because many business taxpayers request a tax-filing extension, they still have time to make the choice on a timely-filed return. A number of special rules and computations apply to this credit. See the instructions to Form 6765 for details.

For eligible small businesses that already filed and failed to choose this option, there is still time to make the choice. Under a special rule for tax-year 2016, they can still do so by filing an amended return. This return must be filed by Dec. 31, 2017.

Amended return forms vary depending upon the type of business. Sole proprietors file Form 1040X. Regular corporations file Form 1120X. S corporations file Form 1120S, identifying it as a corrected return (line H(4). For information on amending a partnership return, see the instructions to Form 1065.

After choosing this option, either on an original or amended return, a small business claims the payroll tax credit by filling out Form 8974, Qualified Small Business Payroll Tax Credit for Increasing Research Activities. This form must be attached to its payroll tax return, usually Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return.

Further details on how and when to claim the credit are in Notice 2017-23, available on IRS.gov. The notice also provides interim guidance on other technical issues, such as controlled groups and the definition of gross receipts.


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Monday, May 1, 2017

IRS Tax Rules For Independent Contractor Versus Employee Status

Classifying a worker as an employee or an independent contractor.

An employer must withhold income taxes and pay Social Security, Medicare taxes and unemployment tax on wages paid to an employee. Employers normally do not have to withhold or pay any taxes on payments to independent contractors.

Here are two key points for small business owners to keep in mind when it comes to classifying workers:

1. Control. The relationship between a worker and a business is important. If the business controls what work is accomplished and directs how it is done, it exerts behavioral control. If the business directs or controls financial and certain relevant aspects of a worker’s job, it exercises financial control. This includes:
  • The extent of the worker's investment in the facilities or tools used in performing services
  • The extent to which the worker makes his or her services available to the relevant market
  • How the business pays the worker, and
  • The extent to which the worker can realize a profit or incur a loss
2. Relationship. How the employer and worker perceive their relationship is also important for determining worker status. Key topics to think about include:
  • Written contracts describing the relationship the parties intended to create
  • Whether the business provides the worker with employee-type benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation or sick pay
  • The permanency of the relationship, and
  • The extent to which services performed by the worker are a key aspect of the regular business of the company
  • The extent to which the worker has unreimbursed business expenses
The IRS can help employers determine the status of their workers by using form Form SS-8, Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding. IRS Publication 15-A, Employer's Supplemental Tax Guide, is also an excellent resource.
Share this tip on social media -- Employee or Independent Contractor? Know the Rules.  https://go.usa.gov/x58ra#IRS

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